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Friday the 13th of October 2006

05:46:40 PM (5575 days, 11h, 53min ago)

YUMMY

Dessert Ingredients

Don’t buy all your ingredients at once but just a few at a time for the desserts you plan to make right away. 

Build your pantry as you go with ingredients for foods you will make often and buy small quantities for the recipes you will make for special occasions. 

Flour spoils easily if not kept in glass jars with tight lids and other ingredients have a shelf life of four to six months.

 

Basic List of ingredients:

 

Flour

Granulated sugar

Butter (unsalted, keep this in the freezer)

Brown sugar

Eggs

Vegetable oil

Crisco®

Unsweetened chocolate

Nuts

Chocolate chips

Cornstarch

Rice

Salt

Vanilla

Milk

Cream

Baking soda

gelatin

Hints and General Notes

 

Keep Clean

 

Hand-washing how-to: Anyone who cooks, caterers, home bakers or restaurant professionals, should incorporate the following hand-washing steps to prevent the spread of germs and disease:

 

Always wash hands before making or eating food.

Use warm water and soap. Lather all over hands and wrists.

Scrub the front and back of hands and between fingers and fingernails, too.

Wash hands for at least 20 seconds.

Rinse under running water, rubbing hands.

Dry with a clean towel.

 

READ YOUR RECIPE CAREFULLY BEFORE STARTING

 

Be sure you have all the ingredients called for and that you understand the recipe clearly.

 

Cultivate the do-it-right attitude and habit.

REMEMBER: IF IT IS WORTH DOING, IT IS WORTH DOING RIGHT!

Baking demands accuracy and care.

Unlike other kinds of cooking, such as soups or stews, you cannot improvise or substitute ingredients.

 

Never carry on another activity while you are mixing a recipe.

Distractions, no matter how small, lead to mistakes.

Let the telephone ring!

 

USE GOOD TOOLS AND UTENSILS

 

Assemble all the bowls, pans, and utensils you will need on your counter or work table before starting.

Use standard measuring cups and spoons.

 

USE CORRECT PAN SIZES

 

Use the type of pan specified in the recipe.

Recipes are carefully calculated as to yield and changing the pan size also alters the baking temperature and time.

Larger, shallower pans need increased heat. 

Smaller, deeper pans need decreased heat.

The size of a baging pan or dish is measured across the top of the container from the inside edge to inside edge.

The depth also is measured on the inside of the pan or dish from the bottom to the top of the rim.

 

Prepare the pan carefully according to the recipe.

Place pans as near the center of the oven as possible.

Do not place pans directly over another and do not crowd the oven (this makes for uneven baking).

 

USE TOP-QUALITY INGREDIENTS AND ASSEMBLE THE INGREDIENTS BEFORE STARTING

 

You can't expect a first-rate product using second-rate ingredients.

Be sure your ingredients are fresh and of the finest quality.

If your recipe says the ingredient must be room temperature, be sure it is room temperature before proceeding.

 

MEASURE THE QUANTITIES CORRECTLY

 

This is a baking must.

One common cause of cooking failures is inaccurate measurement of ingredients.

You can use the best ingredients in the world, but if you do not measure correctly, the recipe will not come out properly.

Also always use level measurements (all measurements in a recipe are level).

 

MEASURING LIQUIDS

 

Use a glass measuring cup.

The glass permits you to see the level of the liquid being measured.

The cup for liquids should have additional space above the one-cup line, so that a full cup can be accurately measured without spilling.

Check the measurement at eye level.

 

MEASURING DRY INGREDIENTS

 

Use standard individual cups.

Lightly spoon dry ingredients into correct cup size, heat up, and level off with edge of spatula by cutting across the top.

Use measuring spoons in this way too.

Flour need not be sifted before measuring unless recipe specifies it.

Sifting flour onto a sheet of wax paper instead of into a bowl cuts down on dishwashing.

Measure brown sugar by packing it firmly into a measuring cup or into a measuring spoon.

 

MIX CAREFULLY

 

Each type of baking has difference methods of performing the mixing. Follow the recipe carefully.

 

USE CORRECT OVEN TEMPERATURES

 

Never increase a cooking temperature because you are in a hurry.

Make sure the racks are placed properly before heating the oven.

If the recipe calls for a preheated oven, preheat it!

Preheat at least 15 minutes before baking.

Don't open the oven door prematurely.

A draft may cause your baked product to fall.

 

OVEN TEMPERATURES

 

225 degrees- Very slow

300 degrees- Slow

350 degrees- Moderate

375 degrees- Moderate hot

400 degrees- Hot

475 degrees- Very hot

 

Completely cool cake layers before frosting them and brush off all loose crumbs from the sides and bottom of each layer.

If you refrigerate the cake for at least 1/2 hour before frosting, it becomes even more crumb resistant.

 

Basic Pie & Tart Crusts

 

1. Pastry for a 9-inch pie shell or a 9 1/2- or 10- by 1-inch tart shell

8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold

1 1/3 cups + 4 tablespoon pastry flour or 1 1/3 cups (dip and sweep method) bleached all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon salt (for savory recipes, use 1 1/2 times the salt)

2 1/2 to 3 1/2 tablespoons ice water

1 1/2 teaspoons cider vinegar

Optional

1/8 teaspoon baking powder (if not using, double the salt)

 

2. Pastry for a 9-inch lattice pie, a 9-inch deep-dish pie, a 10-inch pie shell, or a 12- to 14-inch free-form tart

9 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold

1 1/2 cups + 1 1/2 tablespoons pastry flour or 1 1/2 cups (dip and sweep method) bleached all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon salt (for savory recipes, use 1 1/2 times the salt)

3 1/2 to 4 1/2 tablespoons ice water

1 1/2 teaspoons cider vinegar

Optional

1/8 teaspoon baking powder (if not using, double the salt)

 

3. Pastry for a two-crust 9-inch pie

14 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold

2 1/4 cups + 2 tablespoons pastry flour or 2 1/4 cups (dip and sweep method) bleached all-purpose flour

1/4 + 1/8 teaspoon salt (for savory recipes, use 1 1/2 times the salt)

5 to 7 tablespoons ice water

1 tablespoon cider vinegar

Optional

 

1/4 teaspoon baking powder (if not using, double the salt)

 

Divide the butter into two parts, about two thirds to one third:

 

For #1:  2.5 ounces and 1.5 ounces (5 tablespoons and 3 tablespoons)

For #2:  3 ounces and 1.5 ounces (6 tablespoons and 3 tablespoons)

For #3:  4.5 ounces and 2.5 ounces (9 tablespoons and 5 tablespoons)

 

Cut the butter into 3/4-inch cubes.

Wrap each portion of butter with plastic wrap, refrigerate the larger amount and freeze the smaller for at least 30 minutes.

Place the flour, salt, and baking powder in a re-closable gallon-size freezer bag and freeze for at least 30 minutes.

 

Food processor method:

 

Place the flour mixture in a food processor with the metal blade and process for a few seconds to combine.

Set the bag aside.

Add the larger amount of butter cubes to the flour and process for about 20 seconds or until the mixture resembles coarse meal.

Add the remaining frozen butter cubes and pulse until all of the frozen butter is the size of peas. (

Toss with a fork to see it better.)

Add the lowest amount of the ice water and the vinegar and pulse 6 times.

Pinch a small amount of the mixture together between your fingers.

If it does not hold together, add half the remaining water and pulse 3 times.

Try pinching the mixture again.

 

If necessary, add the remaining water, pulsing 3 times to incorporate it.

The mixture will be in particles and will not hold together without being pinched.

For tiny 1-inch tartlets, omit the baking powder and allow the processing to continue just until a ball forms.

The additional mixing produces a dough that is slightly less flaky but ensures that it will not puff out of shape in the tiny molds.

Spoon the mixture into the plastic bag. 

 

For a double-crust pie, it is easiest to divide the mixture in half at this point.

Holding both ends of the bag opening with you fingers, knead the mixture by alternately pressing it, from the outside of the bag, with the knuckles and heels of your hands until the mixture holds together in one piece and feels slightly stretchy when pulled. 

Wrap the dough with plastic wrap, flatten it into a disc (or discs) and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes, preferably overnight.

For a pie shell and lattice, divide it in a ratio of two thirds: one third — use about 9.5 ounces for the shell and the rest for the lattice, flattening the smaller part into a rectangle.

 

Hand method:

 

Place a medium mixing bowl in the freezer to chill.

Place the flour, salt, and optional baking powder in another medium bowl and whisk to combine them.

Use a pastry cutter or rub the mixture between your fingers to blend the larger portion of the butter into the flour until it resembles coarse meal.

Spoon the mixture, together with the cold butter, into a reclosable gallon-size freezer bag.

Expel any air from the bag and close it.

Use a rolling pin to flatten the butter into flakes.

Place the bag in the freezer for at least 10 minutes or until the butter is very firm.

 

Transfer the mixture to the chilled bowl, scraping the sides of the bag.

Set the bag aside.

Sprinkle the ice water and vinegar onto the mixture, tossing it lightly with a rubber spatula.

Spoon the loose mixture back into the plastic bag.

For a double-crust pie, it is easiest to divide the mixture in half at this point.

Holding both ends of the bag opening with your fingers, knead the mixture by alternately pressing it, from the outside of the bag, with knuckles and heels of your hands until the mixture holds together in one piece and feels slightly stretchy when pulled.

 

Wrap the dough with plastic wrap, flatten it into a disc (or discs) and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes, preferably overnight.

For a pie shell and lattice, divide it in a ratio of two thirds: one third — use about 9.5 ounces for the shell and the rest for the lattice, flattening the smaller part into a rectangle.

 

Store:

 

Refrigerated, up to 2 days; frozen, up to 3 months.

 

 

 

Cakes

 

To keep holes and tunnels out of your cake, run a knife through the batter after you have finished mixing it.

This removes air holes.

 

To keep loaf cakes fresher longer, cut slices from the middle rather than from the end. When you're finished slicing, firmly push the two leftover sections together to reform a loaf.

This way, you eliminate leaving an exposed, quick-to-dry-out "end" slice.

 

To plump dried fruit for fruitcake, place fruit in a shallow baking dish, sprinkle generously with water, then cover.

Place dish in oven while oven is heating for baking cake.

In 10 to 15 minutes the fruit will be soft and plump.

Cool slightly and add to cake batter.

 

To decorate a cake directly on its serving plate, slip strips of wax paper under the edge of the cake, allowing them to hang over the rim of the plate.

Frost cake, then, with a quick motion, pull out the paper.

This leaves the serving plate nice and clean without a trace of frosting.

 

To prevent a freshly-baked cake from sticking to the serving platter, dust the platter with confectioners' sugar.

 

An angel food cake will slice neatly without crumbling if you freeze it first, and then thaw it.

 

To cool a cake quickly for frosting, pop it into the freezer while you make the frosting.

By the time frosting is ready, the cake will be cool and ready to slip out of the pan.

 

To prevent cake filling from soaking into the cake, sprinkle layers lightly with confectioners' sugar before spreading filling.

 

Cake will be less like to stick to the pan if you put it on a wet towel to cool as soon as you take it from the oven.

 

For a fast topping, place a paper doily on top of the cake. Sift confectioners' sug

1 Comment(s).

Posted by Jennifer Winget:

I am so happy to see this article. Dessert is my favorite item and I have tasted more than 15 type desserts from different shops. Now I am planning to make 16 th dessert with the help of this article. After making this, I definitely share images. business consultant services
Monday the 27th of July 2020 @ 07:25:35 AM (539 days, 22h, 14min ago)

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